Steve Job’s criticizes Android and RIM operating systems- responses are quick and pointed

Posted on October 20, 2010

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Google and RIM were quick to respond to Apple’s Steve Job’s highly critical comments from Monday’s earnings call from Apple. I think that Apple is a bit out of bounds on their thinking of what an open code system, but none the less, let the games continue.

Google- Google vice president of engineering Andy Rubin replied Tuesday via Twitter, writing “the definition of open: mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make'”

(Jim Balsillie, Co-CEO at Research In Motion (RIM)) For those of us who live outside of Apple’s distortion field, we know that 7” tablets will actually be a big portion of the market and we know that Adobe Flash support actually matters to customers who want a real web experience. We also know that while Apple’s attempt to control the ecosystem and maintain a closed platform may be good for Apple, developers want more options and customers want to fully access the overwhelming majority of web sites that use Flash. We think many customers are getting tired of being told what to think by Apple. And by the way, RIM has achieved record shipments for five consecutive quarters and recently shared guidance of 13.8 – 14.4 million BlackBerry smartphones for the current quarter. Apple’s preference to compare its September-ending quarter with RIM’s August-ending quarter doesn’t tell the whole story because it doesn’t take into account that industry demand in September is typically stronger than summer months, nor does it explain why Apple only shipped 8.4 million devices in its prior quarter and whether Apple’s Q4 results were padded by unfulfilled Q3 customer demand and channel orders. As usual, whether the subject is antennas, Flash or shipments, there is more to the story and sooner or later, even people inside the distortion field will begin to resent being told half a story.

(Fierce Mobile) Hours after Apple  CEO Steve Jobs sharply criticized smartphone rivals Google and Research In Motion during a surprise appearance on the computing giant’s quarterly earnings call Monday, executives from both companies have responded to the charges. Jobs directed his most barbed comments at Google’s Android mobile operating system, stating “Google loves to characterize Android as open and iPhone as closed. We see this disingenuous and clouding the difference,” Jobs said. “The first thing we think of when we

 

hear open is Windows, which is available on a lot of devices. Unlike Windows, where PCs have the same interface, Android is very fragmented. HTC and Motorola install proprietary user interfaces to differentiate themselves. The user is left to figure it out.”

 

Google vice president of engineering Andy Rubin replied Tuesday via Twitter, writing “the definition of open: mkdir android ; cd android ; repo init -u git://android.git.kernel.org/platform/manifest.git ; repo sync ; make'” For those not fluent in code-speak, Rubin’s post refers to the commands a developer would use to build their own copy of Android on any Linux machine, essentially underlining just how open the Android platform truly is. (Google CEO Eric Schmidt later retweeted Rubin’s message on his own Twitter account.) Also joining the conversation: Ian Dodsworth, CEO of Twitter client developer TweetDeck–on Monday, Jobs said “TwitterDeck [sic] recently launched their Android app, and had to contend with 100 different versions of software on 244 different handsets.” Dodsworth’s reply: “Did we at any point say it was a nightmare developing on Android? Errr nope, no we didn’t. It wasn’t.”

 

Apple reported fiscal Q4 revenues totaling $20.34 billion on Monday, up from $12.21 billion a year ago–the company sold 14.1 million

 

iPhones during the quarter, almost double the 7.4 million sold in the year-ago quarter and smashing its previous record of 8.75 million units. “We handily beat RIM’s 12.1 million BlackBerrys sold in their last quarter,” Jobs said. I don’t see them catching up with us in the foreseeable future. It will be a challenge for them to create a mobile software platform and convince developers to support a third platform.” Jobs also criticized the forthcoming wave of seven-inch tablet devices like RIM’s BlackBerry PlayBook, insisting that 10-inch units like Apple’s iPad deliver a superior user experience.

 

Research In Motion co-CEO Jim Balsille turned to the device maker’s official Inside BlackBerry blog to respond. “For those of us who live outside of Apple’s distortion field, we know that 7″ tablets will actually be a big portion of the market and we know that Adobe Flash support actually matters to customers who want a real web experience,” Balsillie writes. “We also know that while Apple’s attempt to control the ecosystem and maintain a closed platform may be good for Apple, developers want more options and customers want to fully access the overwhelming majority of websites that use Flash. We think many customers are getting tired of being told what to think by Apple. And by the way, RIM has achieved record shipments for five consecutive quarters and recently shared guidance of 13.8-14.4 million BlackBerry smartphones for the current quarter. Apple’s preference to compare its September-ending quarter with RIM’s August-ending quarter doesn’t tell the whole story because it doesn’t take into account that industry demand in September is typically stronger than summer months, nor does it explain why Apple only shipped 8.4 million devices in its prior quarter and whether Apple’s Q4 results were padded by unfulfilled Q3 customer demand and channel orders.”

 

 

 

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